Barcelona day 2 – Camp Nou and Sagrada Familia

Day two in Barcelona was Tao’s birthday day, and I’d planned a couple of surprises for him.

In the morning, we went to Camp Nou, home of Futbol Club Barcelona. There’s a museum tour (I’d done it before and wasn’t particularly enamoured by it, but I knew the birthday boy would want to experience it). The history of the club is actually really interesting – it was founded in 1899 by a group of Swiss, English and Catalan footballers led by Joan Gamper, and the museum tour experience is a mix of photos, stories, artefacts (such as original football strips and boots) and trophies. Oh lord so many trophies.

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Tao is an Arsenal fan and we had a sad little photoshoot next to a trophy that FCB won over Arsenal…

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Also as part of the tour you get to go outside the museum and into the stadium grounds – with a capacity of 99,000, its the biggest stadium in Europe. It’s somewhat hard to really comprehend just how big it is, even with photos…

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One of my favourite things about FCB is their slogan “Més que un club” (More than a club). It came to symbolise the Catalan people and their desire for freedom. The slogan is printed across the stadium.

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After a quick pitstop for tapas (patatas bravas with every meal, no regrets) we hopped in a taxi and sped over to Sagrada Familia. One of the most popular attractions in Barcelona, when pre-booking you have to choose a specific timeslot. As part of the tickets I bought, we got entry to the main church, entry up to the towers of one of the facades, and an audio guide.

Sagrada Familia is another Gaudi masterpiece. I don’t even think masterpiece is enough to describe it. Construction began in 1882, and in 2010 it passed the midway completion point. Currently its schedule to be finished in 2026, 100 years after Gaudi died. Previous estimates, based on the technology of the day, guessed that it would take hundreds of years to complete, but thanks to improvements in design technology (and a boost of funding), it should be finished earlier.

It’s difficult to know where to start when describing it. We entered from the Nativity facade. Ultimately there will be three grand facades – the completed Nativity facade (which has the most influence from Gaudi, having been worked on during his lifetime), the Passion facade which was completed in the 70’s, and the Glory facade whihc is yet to be completed.

The Nativity facade depicts the birth of Jesus. Because it was worked on during Gaudi’s lifetime, it’s intricate and elaborate, taking a lot of influence from nature. It’s overwhelming, to say the least.

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In comparison, the Passion facade is sparse, austere and full of harsh lines. Portraying the suffering of Jesus during his crucifixion and the suffering of man, it’s a colder, more dramatic aspect. The Glory facade is still under construction and under tarpaulin, sadly!

But it’s the inside of the church that captured my heart.

Gaudi’s vision was a cathedral-sized church that embraced nature and brought light in intelligent and strategic ways. Often when we think of light and and wanting a well lit space, that space is just flooded with light and there’s no balance. Gaudi understood balance, and knew that too much light was not right for his vision either.

As you enter the church, you’re struck by phenomenal stained glass, giant tree-like pillars that spread into branches with leaves at the ceiling, and light.

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The stained glass is incredible, following Gaudi’s mosaic style (seen previously in Casa Batllo for example). We sat in the church (which is in a typical cross-shape) for a long time just marvelling at the light, the windows, the colours.

The ceiling is also beautiful beyond words – there are signs of nature everywhere, the columns themselves mirroring trees and branches.

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At the centre of the cross is a statue of Jesus, and despite not being religious myself, it was refreshing to see people acknowledge this is a church and not just a tourist attraction.

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As part of our trip, we took the (only slightly scary) lift up one of the towers on the Nativity facade. Way up high above the city, on a sunny day, it’s a stunning experience.

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That said, in hindsight, walking down the teeny tiny narrow spiral staircase, with occasional light from little windows, its quite a nervy experience. The lift up, in comparison, was a breeze. As you walk down, there are little balconies where you can step out and get a wonderful view of the city – but it’s definitely not for those with a fear of heights!

When we got back down to ground level (which took ages because seriously, that scary spiral staircase is slow-going) we explored the Passion facade and admired the towers.

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An absolute must-see in Barcelona – I know everyone says that, but I have to admit, before I visited the first time, I didn’t know much about it and wasn’t that bothered. Shame on me. It’s incredible, go and see it, you won’t regret it.

Barcelona day 1 – Casa Batllo

A couple of weeks ago I surprised my boyfriend with a trip to Barcelona for his birthday. He knew we were going somewhere (he had to take time off work after all) but didn’t know where until the day of. He’d only been to Barcelona as a tot, and whilst I’d been years ago and loved the city, my experience then wasn’t great, I wanted to go again with the best possible company.

On our first full day, I took him to Casa Batllo. One of Gaudi’s amazing creations, this former residence is full of mosaic tiles, stained glass, wavy lines (there are no straight lines in the building!) and light.

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One of my favourite buildings in Barcelona, the Noble room is my dream room. The whole building has a very visceral feel to it – this means it just “feels” right (literally its the gut feeling when something is good). Huge wavy windows let in light, stained glass balanced the light, and phenomenal chandeliers add shadows and texture.

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The ceilings are equally beautiful…

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I particularly loved photographing the lights from various angles – first how we’d normally view them, and then later from directly underneath, to see the shapes and patterns both of the fixtures and fittings but also the shadows they cast on the ceiling itself.

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I think my favourite is this next one – the directly-underneath-view was breathtaking, as the ceiling spirals beyond the light.

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Thankfully the owners of the house, Josep Batllo and his wife, who commissioned Gaudi to redesign it in 1904, were very open minded. They let him run free, and one of his most notable design features (and demonstration of how well he understood light and the need for different amounts of light at different levels) was the central atrium/elevator shaft that runs from top to bottom of the house.

Gaudi understood that at lower levels, more light was needed. He had the entire central well tiled in shades of blue. As you start at the bottom, the tiles are the lightest, palest blue – this would make the space brighter and reflect what little light reaches them. As you go further up, the tiles get darker, to signify more light reaching them, and less need for them to brighten the space.

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The rooftop and overall feel is somewhat skeletal – the roof is arched and curved and is thought to be the scaly back of a dragon (or dinosaur!), covered in more mosaic tiles to give texture and depth. It’s said that the rooftop spine, turrets and cross represent St George slaying the dragon – and I discovered that St George is not only the patron saint of England but also Catalonia, where Gaudi himself was from.

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Throughout the whole building, I got a sense of space and light – but not in a traditional way. Every element has been thought of differently, to be just right – not just typical big windows, but how the light fits the space.

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There’s also a little sun-trap terrace – it’s a little difficult to imagine what it would have been like 100 years ago because the sound of traffic and the neighbouring more-modern buildings change the vibe somewhat, but when it goes quiet, it’s a continuation of the truly beautiful building.

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^ Even outside on the terrace, the shapes are wavy and the mosaic tiles are plentiful.

Located on Passeig de Gracia, close to metro stations Diagonal and Passeig de Gracia, it costs around 25euro (that price includes an audioguide), and is absolutely worth visiting.

P.S. Should you wish, you can click through the photos and see them in an extra-giant scale. All dem megapixels at work…

Ely Cathedral

In my last blog post, I went off on a tangent about religion, and how much I don’t need it in my life, in fact what I need are people to just care about each other. Not difficult.

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That said, I do love me some historical buildings – even if they happen to be religious.

This is Ely Cathedral, in Cambridgeshire. Ely was an important Christian centre from as early as the 7th century, and was founded by St Etheldreda, the daughter of an Anglo-Saxon King. Basically, its an old religious area.

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The cathedral itself was built from 1083–1375, is a mix of Romanesque and Gothic styles. I remember going to visit quite often as a kid, and being a little girl in such a huge building was a memorable experience – although, even now, I can’t quite grasp how big it is. I can never seem to get any context when I’m inside, it just seems to go on and on.

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Last time I was in Ely, I decided to pop into the cathedral to take some photos. Like I said, I’m not religious, but I can appreciate incredible, historic buildings. The ceiling of the nave is an impressive feat of ceiling design.

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In fact, all of the ceilings are painted incredibly, and preserved so well.

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A lot of the cathedral is gated off, and members and paying visitors can explore more. The free bits are pretty good though, lets be fair.

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In one of the little side chapels, there are piles of hand-stitched cushions, featuring names and dates of various saints. Again, I appreciate the craftsmanship and the effort that went into every detailed design.

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As a child, I could never decide if stained glass windows appealed to me or freaked me out. I’m pretty sure I like them now, though I should admit the designs occasionally leave me feeling a bit disturbed.

If you’re in the area, Ely Cathedral is worth visiting – its rich, varied history, with Saxons, Danish invasions and even Jurassic finds in the area (an almost complete specimen of a Pliosaur was found nearby!), it’s a sweet little place.

Exploring Bordeaux

Last month, Patrick and I flew off to Bordeaux for a week – a weekend exploring the city, and 5 days in a chateau for the wedding of some friends of ours.

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Usually when we go anywhere, we look for gay bars (for him), and cocktail bars (for me), but this time there was a whole other treat instore – the Bordeaux Wine Festival.

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Stretching 2km along the river, this outdoor festival is a new one to me – you pay 20euro for your own wine glass (in a cute little lanyard-pouch combo, that you hang around your neck) and booklet of coupons and info, and then you make your way down the river, stopping at 13 different tasting stations, each one from a different vineyard in the area.

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The afternoon was a hazy but enjoyable one, with Patrick showing off with his fluent French, my schoolgirl French slowly improving, and maaany different wines drunk. We had our favourites, but I’ll be damned if I can remember now.

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We also explored the city over the course of weekend (navigating like locals by the end of it – admittedly its a small city…).

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La Grosse Cloche (15th century), the second remaining gate of the Medieval walls.

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I loved the French buildings – generally, old French architecture always woos me.

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We made a little friend – this sweetie was so happy, wriggling on a doormat. Simple pleasures.

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A walk through the park near our hotel and near our new-favourite restaurant revealed this pretty statue – a memorial to the children of Gironde who died during the Franco-Prussian war, 1870-1871

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French posters and a shop sign – beautiful Rob Ryan style lettering.

And of course, at the end of the wine festival, we went foraging for food and… more wine.

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All in all, an awesome weekend, before we headed off to the chateau to relax!

Warsaw eats

Hello from (my garden in) Warsaw!

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I actually have a backlog of blog posts to write about my travels in Bordeaux and Berlin, but those posts require some serious photo editing (weddings in both cities mean I have so many pics!) but in the meantime I wanted to share a couple of foodie places I tried in Warsaw over the past few days.

Let me say now that one is very typically Polish in general, and the other has a hint of Polish misogyny, but that’s about it.

On Sunday night, we went to a place called Rybna Chata – basically, a fish hut. On ul. Piaseczynska, in Prace Duze (outskirts of Warsaw, to the south), it’s a very sweet new little place, built in traditional Polish style, serving a fresh and changing menu. Prices are per 100g, and range from 11zl to about 15zl per 100g.

There are some simple side salads (all traditional Polish), some basic drinks, but the real stars of the show are the fish – there’s no guarantee of what they’ll have, but when we went there was cod, whitefish (whitebait?), carp, pike perch, halibut, trout and salmon, amongst others. We got a couple of portions of code, a portion of whitefish, some fries, side salads, beer and wine.

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Freshly fried cod with garlic butter, and fries. This was really delicious, and miraculously for me there were no bones in it!

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This was the whitefish – also apparently delicious, but it didn’t fancy wrestling with fish bones to try it!

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We ate outside on the terrace out back which was lovely – pretty unspoilt at the moment!

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But I can imagine it being a really lovely place in the winter too – really cosy and warm!

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It was relatively expensive for Polish roadside eating – not crazy expensive, but not knowing the weight of the fish you get can give you a surprise when it comes to pay!

The other new place I tried out is an American diner on Zwirki i Wigury road in Mokotowskie. Apparently it’s been open for a couple of years (Foursquare tips told me a lot!) so I went in for breakfast.

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The breakfast menu is pretty short – a full fried breakie, a Jeff’s version with steak, muesli, and pancakes with either butter, bacon or syrup (you could buy more extras).

I went for the pancakes with syrup…

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Three thick American style pancakes, with a dusting of icing sugar, a pot of syrup, a slice apiece of grapefruit and orange and.. a lettuce leaf.

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They were… okay. They weren’t anything amazing, the portion was fine, but given how much I love pancakes from The Breakfast Club back in London (a tower of delicious thick fluffy pancakes, with a wonderful syrup/berries/whipped cream explosion on top!) these were just okay. Filling, and pretty cheap – 11.90zl for the portion (about £2.40).

Weirdly, they were the same price as a cup of coffee – I got a latte which took a while to arrive:

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Coffee and pancakes for a fiver ain’t bad I guess.

A couple of things kinda bothered me about Jeff’s though – first up, the decor is SO forced American – it’s so busy, it could be headache inducing after a while. Secondly, the service was pretty crappy – this was 10am on a Monday, there were more employees wandering around than customers but it still took a while for me to get service.

But my biggest bugbear was the fact the waitresses were in uniform that consisted of a very tight football shirt, knee high socks, and tiny denim hot pant shorts with butt cheeks hanging out. The waiters? They were wearing jeans and tshirts. For me, this gave such a crappy message and reinforced shitty misogynistic tendencies I’ve experienced in Poland. Not cool.

Finally, this evening we went for dinner in our regular haunt, a brilliant homemade pierogi place. Except it wasn’t brilliant tonight, I was pretty disappointed, and won’t bother reviewing it. C’est la vie.

The brunch that grew and grew

I’ve been lucky enough to have a week off work for Easter – my first longer period off work this year. My first port of call when having so much time off is to come north and see my best friend and my parents. So on Wednesday I trekked up and got together with Lauren for first a gig, and then a day-long brunch on Thursday.

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This isn’t a recipe post really, it’s too simple to justify calling it that, it’s just a ~look at beautiful foodstuffs~ post.

We started off by doing a lot of shopping the night before… adding more and more food to our baskets, without a clear idea at first. Ultimately, we decided on a biiig frittata, a brioche bread and butter pudding, a meat and cheese platter with crackers, crumpets and snacks, and we did buy some other snack foods that thankfully lay unopened.

It was definitely a case of eyes bigger than our bellies, and we did NOT eat all of the food… Just a lot of it…

Frittata is the easiest thing to make, but in case you’re interested, we used:

1 yellow pepper
1 red pepper
2 small sweet potatoes
2 small regular potatoes
bacon (enough for a small army, or however much you want really)
1 bunch of spring onions
5 eggs (3 pictured, because this is a play-by-ear thing)
milk
garlic (we used crushed garlic from a jar – about 2 cloves worth)

For both dishes, preheat your oven to 180c.

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It really is very simple…

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Chop all of your veggies…

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Cleaning the ones that need cleaning…

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Peeling the ones that need peeling…

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Beat some eggs and milk together – we started with 3 eggs, but added 2 more, so 5 eggs + about 170-200ml of milk, a pinch of salt, and your garlic (it’s way better to get the garlic into the eggy-milk mixture, because it’ll be distributed more evenly)

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Chuck all the veggies, and chopped up bacon, and whatever else you want to add, into a dish, pour on the eggy-milk mixture, and top with cheese…

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Into the oven it goes! About 30-40 minutes, until the cheese is more crispy than gooey!

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We also decided to make a little somethin’ somethin’ sweet – a chocolate and cherry brioche bread and butter pudding. Calm your artery-clogging boots – it’s naughty, definitely naughty, but it’s not the worst thing in the world… That’s how I’m justifying it!

If you’re interested, to make what we did, you’ll need:

1 large-ish chocolate brioche
Butter (not a little, little blobs here and there)
Nutella
Cherries
4 eggs
Milk (about 150ml)
A little bit of sugar

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Start by slicing your brioche into 1-2cm slices, spreading with a little bit of butter, and a healthy dollop of Nutella, before lining the slices into a baking dish, slightly overlapping…

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Fill the baking dish with slices, stud with cherries, and make another eggy-milk mixture (NO garlic this time – add a little bit of sugar if you like!), pour onto the slice brioche, add a couple of blobs of butter around the dish, and a little sprinkle of sugar for a crispy top. Into the oven that goes! About 35-45 minutes should do it!

Brunch with Lauren

While that’s cooking, go and indulge in other food, because that’s what sensible people do, honest… Make some coffee, get some juice, light a candle, snuggle up. Anything to pass the time before this guy is ready…

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Isn’t he handsome?

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What a babe!

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Brunch with Lauren

At this point, you can stop waiting, put down the camera, and forget all dignity. Just eat, nobody needs to know that you have seconds, thirds or mores.

My life definitely needs more brunches – especially with my best friend.

Bonus pic – we have matching Mailchimp tshirts, you can join our snugglefest food parties if you have one too! (I may or may not be kidding)

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Project 365 – part 4

The final chapter.

This is the part that feels most relevant to my life at the moment – that might be because the last photo was taken 6 days ago, so it’s not that surprising. But this final quarter starts at the beginning of December, and actually, it’s a pretty good quarter.

December through to February saw me do some more travelling (Warsaw, Jersey, Cannes, Manchester), spend super happy times with my family and best friend, throw some colour into my life, and learn some new stuff.

Festive December…

December saw a lot of pre-Christmas crafting, my nails snapped (need moar calcium?), I got a new iPhone, I had another trip back to my parents (see photos with my mama and my Lauren), I acquired a super sassy hat (blue glittery tophat!) and sated a work-Christmas-party hangover with a trip to Five Guys. Christmas was spent in Poland which was relaxing, with board games (including a Polish game about queueing in front of shops in the 1980s) and walks in the forest. New Year was spent with my best friend, eating a lot of Turkish food, playing with sparklers and having sekrit times.

New Year – January…

The New Year continued with time spent with my best friend – on the first of January we went on the London Eye, which I absolutely loved. We also visited Winter Wonderland (btw HOW BIG is the German Beer Hall there?! it’s amazing!). In contrast to last month, my nails were now screwed because of wearing false nails. C’est la vie! This month also saw me get my bangs cut back in, travel to Jersey for a beautiful few days for work, try a street dance class and do Fire Marshal training for work.

The final month – February…

February was the final month of my Project 365 – by now, it was completely ingrained in me to photograph something everyday. The month started with a weekend in Cannes for the Midem music hack weekend. Such a surreal weekend, I loved it. I also became a qualified First Aider (spent part of the afternoon flouncing around pretending the mannequin was my boyfriend.. I thought more people would do this, apparently not..). I travelled to Manchester to see Childish Gambino, ate the biggest pancake ever at My Old Dutch, received the most beautiful flowers for Valentines Day, went to a London Fashion Week event, visited Greenwich, bought a dress, and generally continued to love London.

Phew.

Once again, I have to say thank you so much to you guys for reading and revisiting my year in photos with me. Part of me looks back and thinks not much has changed, but a bigger part of me is amazed at how far I’ve come. I’ve loved looking back at the little details in my life, laughing at how silly things have been, seeing myself move on from sad times and throw myself into the good times.

I’m already 5 days into my next 365, and can’t wait to share that with you.

Project 365 – part 3

First up, I want to thank you all for reading my garbled round-ups of the first half of my Project 365, for clicking through my snaps, and for putting up with my constant banging on about how great it is.

I especially loved the comment from one of my mama’s friends, that she enjoyed looking at the randomness of the photos.

That’s how I like to see it myself – even during the most mundane of days, where I stayed in bed ‘cos I was sad, or said very little at work ‘cos I was uninspired, I still think documenting the little details, and remember why they were important enough to photograph (or conversely, why my day was crappy enough to warrant a photo of an apple), is important to me.

The next quarter covers September through to November. This was as rocky as the previous months, in all honesty, and my closest friends were there for me a lot. This quarter spans heartbreak, mistakes and distracting myself from that, but also some brilliant times spent my best friends and parents, Christmas cake and seeing Newcastle play.

September up…

September started with Patrick and I going to London Mela, a huge south Asian festival in west London. This involved dressing up and eating a lot. September also saw some crazy rain vs crazy sun, spiderwebs, a new passport and some vegetables. This is the month I started my hexagon quilt, which grew rapidly; but probably the real highlight was a weekend in Amsterdam with my best friend – one of the best trips ever, I’m still so happy from it.

October here…

October saw me leaving my job at Reading Room, an agency I’d worked at for 18 months. I left behind some brilliant colleagues and clients, and a social life that will never be beaten. I also spoke at 2 conferences (The Digital Barn, and 12 Devs), which were so much fun. Thank you to the people who listened to blahblahblah on! In between leaving my old job and new job I went home to my parents for a week, which saw a haircut, dancing with my best friend, and cuddles with my mama bear. I also baked Christmas cakes this month, including the little mini cake shaped like a rose. A pretty good month actually.

November saw the suckiest moments of the year, but also a great big whopping highlight – I started my new job at feelunique.com – as witnessed by photos cropping up of freebie products, and dressing up for the COPRA ball (an annual ball for retailers in the cosmetics/perfume industry). I spent more time crafting, took a late-night rickshaw with Patrick (drunk + G.A.Y = makes sense), and went back to my parents for a weekend where we ate a lot of Christmas cake and went to a football match.

All in all, a successful autumn.

Project 365 (part 2)

So yesterday I posted the first quarter of my Project 365 (a photo a day for a year). I humblebragged about how proud I was, and going through the next section of photos has been no different. It’s so interesting to see how far I’ve come, in the space of a year – how much has changed, how much I’ve done, and it’s really lovely to look back on photos of relatively insignificant things and think how fun they were.

The whole process is making me realise how much I value the little details in life, which has made P365 so worthwhile.

So here’s June…

June was the start of the summer heatwave – it saw me eat at some goooood places (Hache burger, Meat Liquor, that fancypants 1920s stylee French place near Piccadilly.. name escapes me..), also this was the month I hung out with the Queen at the trooping the colour, tear a ligament in my foot, and finally spend a lotttt of man-hours making origami hearts. They were made for a summer garden party for my parents in July, and I still love looking at the progress of the hearts – I made 400 of them in less than a weekend. It. Was. Glorious.

July was this…

The heatwave continued, London was a sweaty mass. The month started with a sciencey event where I learned about alcohol (by drinking a fair amount of free booze… all in the name of science!), a trip to Poland for the aforementioned party – look at those hearts in situ! I was in love with them! July was also my birthday (the 17th! represented here with a chocolate ball and raspberry sorbet ball.. heheh balls..), the month my hair kinda exploded with volume, there was free Eton Mess in Soho Square, and I bought kabanos.

August was good…

It started with a little photo-montage of how I made origami stars (which I then didn’t blog..), and my new camera arrived! What a little babe! I had lunch with a dog in a pub; Patrick and I got hammered and barged into Ed’s Diner for the most amazing chips; I worked on my portfolio site. I also flew to Berlin for a long weekend – another garden party, plus boardgames and photobooth fun! Lauren came to visit, we played Guess Who! amongst other sekrit activities. This was also Notting Hill Carnival month, where Patrick and I accidentally joined the parade and shook our booties.

I’m getting all nostalgic looking back at these photos – for about 90-95% of them, I can still remember exactly what I was doing, how I was feeling, why I snapped that photo, what it means to me. My actual memory is pretty shoddy, and I’m a sentimental person, so being able to flick back on photos and remember every feeling (good and bad!) is a novel experience. My next post will be autumn, which holds some sad memories, but also some exciting changes. More tomorrow.

Project 365 (part 1)

Friday (Feb 28th) saw the final day of my first completed Project 365. P365 is a photo a day for a year. Sounds simple, and it’s something I’d actually attempted to do a few times previously, but my god is it difficult.

My previous attacks at doing it always faltered after a couple of weeks, then I’d forget a couple of days and suddenly BAM! its 6 months and I’ve forgotten it. But not this time.

Let me just preface, this is a bit of teeny tiny humblebragging – I am So. Damn. Proud.

So because there are 365 photos to share, I figured I’d do separate posts and split it down – so there are 3 months at a time.

Here are some facts, who doesn’t like facts…

  • There are a fair few selfies. Sorrynotsorry.
  • There’s not a whole load of pattern, consistency, rhyme or reason to the photos taken – basically like me – I very little pattern, consistency, rhyme or reason.. yeah..

These photos chronicle my life for a year, which has had ups and downs, and snaps include…

  • Food. A lot of food. The naughty food crops up more often than the healthy food – let’s be fair, these things photograph nicely. But rest assured I ate plenty of veg in between the junk
  • Booze. It was a summer fuelled by Pimms, I’m surprised it doesn’t feature more
  • Boyfriends, break ups, sad days, good dates, bad dates, and mistakes I’ve made
  • Mundane life – sometimes a photo of a streetlight, at 11.59pm when I haven’t taken a photo of anything else that, seems like a good idea
  • Travel – one of the best things about the past year, starting with the kickstarted my 365, Lisbon, Newcastle, Devon, Warsaw, Berlin, Amsterdam, Warsaw, Jersey, Cannes and Manchester(!)
  • Health, weight gain, weight loss, an indulgent summer followed by an autumn of mistakes followed by a winter of hibernating
  • Happy days – seeing my parents, my best friends, feeling safe

Images are clickable and make a nice little slideshow, thanks for that one WP

So hey, here’s March 2013…

March started with a trip to Lisbon, saw some flowers bloom, legs bared (…then the snow came), and Easter, which involved a visit home to my parents and egg painting/dying.

April 2013

April saw more sunshine, the London Marathon, ice cream, more flowers and going to the gym a lot.

May 2013

May was a mellow month with some good cocktails, a trip to Devon, pancakes, cameras and seeing The Book of Mormon.

My next 365 has already started, with a trip to Birmingham yesterday, which deserves its own blog post really.